Last Update: Sep 27, 2022.

Submitted by: Inesita Frangos
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Will Dimorphos hit Earth?

Dimorphos is a small asteroid moonlet orbiting the near-Earth asteroid Didymos. The asteroid system poses no threat to Earth, NASA officials have said, making it a perfect target to test out a kinetic impact €“ which may be needed if an asteroid is ever on track to hit Earth.

Unprecedented asteroid test: Early October 2022 At some 6.8 million miles from Earth, the DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) spacecraft will hit the 525-foot-wide Dimorphos asteroid on around Oct. 1, 2022. It's humanity's first-ever attempt to purposefully move an asteroid.

Unprecedented asteroid test: Early October 2022 At some 6.8 million miles from Earth, the DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) spacecraft will hit the 525-foot-wide Dimorphos asteroid on around Oct. 1, 2022. It's humanity's first-ever attempt to purposefully move an asteroid.

Unprecedented asteroid test: Early October 2022 At some 6.8 million miles from Earth, the DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) spacecraft will hit the 525-foot-wide Dimorphos asteroid on around Oct. 1, 2022. It's humanity's first-ever attempt to purposefully move an asteroid.

When And Where To Watch Live As NASA Intentionally

Didymos and Dimorphos have a two-year orbit of the Sun that's slightly inclined to those of the planets and also slightly eccentric. They're found just beyond Earth to just beyond Mars. As DART reaches them Didymos and Dimorphos will be around 6.8 million miles/11 million kilometers away from Earth.

When And Where To Watch Live As NASA Intentionally

Dimorphos is a small asteroid moonlet orbiting the near-Earth asteroid Didymos. The asteroid system poses no threat to Earth, NASA officials have said, making it a perfect target to test out a kinetic impact €“ which may be needed if an asteroid is ever on track to hit Earth.

A NASA spacecraft has hit an asteroid in an unprecedented test designed to prevent potentially devastating collisions with Earth. NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft crashed into the asteroid Dimorphos about 11 million kilometres (6.8 million miles) from Earth at about 23:00 GMT on Monday.

The 1,260-pound Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, or DART, collided with the estimated 11-billion-pound, 520-foot-long asteroid Dimorphos at 14,000 mph about 7 million miles from Earth. The spacecraft hit about 55 feet from the asteroid's center.

Nasa's DART Spacecraft Successfully Crashes Into Dimorphos Asteroid

The 1,260-pound Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, or DART, collided with the estimated 11-billion-pound, 520-foot-long asteroid Dimorphos at 14,000 mph about 7 million miles from Earth. The spacecraft hit about 55 feet from the asteroid's center.

Nasa's DART Spacecraft Successfully Crashes Into Dimorphos Asteroid

Dimorphos and Didymos are not a threat to Earth €” and they won't be after the test. NASA just wants to understand whether it has the ability to deflect a space rock of Dimorphos's size, which could devastate a region of Earth if it were to hit the planet.2 days ago

The large binary asteroid Didymos and its moonlet Dimorphos currently pose no threat to Earth.

A close up view of Dimorphos seconds before the DART spacecraft hit the asteroid on Monday, September 26.

WATCH LIVE: Nasa's DART Spacecraft Crashes Into An Asteroid

The DART spacecraft is set to crash into Dimorphos at 7:14 p.m. ET, at which point it will stop transmitting images back to Earth. Images of the collision and its aftermath, taken by the LICIACube, will take a few days to reach Earth after impact.

WATCH LIVE: Nasa's DART Spacecraft Crashes Into An Asteroid

The 1,260-pound Double Asteroid Redirection Test spacecraft, or DART, collided with the estimated 11 billion pound, 520-foot long asteroid Dimorphos at 14,000 miles per hour close to 7 million miles from Earth. The spacecraft hit about 55 feet from the asteroid's center.

At the time of impact, Didymos and Dimorphos were relatively close to Earth €“ within 6.8 million miles (11 million kilometers). The team estimates that the spacecraft hit the asteroid at a point about 55 feet (17 meters) away from the space rock's center.